RADIO TRASH PLAYLIST ARCHIVE
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BRENT FORD AND THE NYLONS
'19th Nervous Breakdown' (Brum Beat, 1978).

'Everybody's On Revolver Tonite' sang 'O'Level on their 1978 'Malcolm' EP, that 'everybody' even included Brum cabaret punks Brent Ford And The Nylons who raced through two of the tracks on this record during the show's new artist slot. Unfortunately that TV appearance didn't do much to improve sales of the 45 which had appeared a few weeks earlier with half the pressing still remaining unsold months later. Those remaining copies were then housed in a folded Christmas card picture sleeve and if you were lucky they were signed inside by the band in character. Other songs given the 100mph treatment in a typical Nylons live set included 'Gloria', 'Highway 61' and 'Little Queenie'.

THE BLEACH BOYS
'You've Got Nothing' (Tramp, 1978).

B-side of The Bleach Boys snotty punk classic 'Chloroform' and every bit as good. Produced by Tramp Records owner Terry Friend who was a folk singer by day and a grave digger by night (or was it the other way round?). Judging by how amateur this record is I'm not sure if Terry was qualified to call himself a producer or how Bleach Boys bassist Chris Sutoris was previously trusted to play on a 1974 LP by Terry's band Stonefield Tramp. The release date of The Bleach Boys next record 'Stocking-Clad Nazi Death Squad Bitches' has been a matter of much debate but an SRT number scratched in the dead wax confirms it was 1988 which is much later than most thought.

PHIL CANNING
'Sell Out' (Woodbine St, 1979).

I don't know anything about Phil Canning, but Cheeky who backed Phil on this single I do know. Cheeky also released a single on Woodbine St that attracts interest from both punk and NWOBHM collectors. Ask Cheeky which side of the fence they favour and they'll say they were just high energy pub rockers with a live set heavy on Status Quo covers. Thankfully any boogie fixation they might have had was kept to a minimum while backing Phil Canning to give 'Sell Out' the much more appealling description of 'pub punk', though the flip side 'Underground' is a little too much like the Quo for my liking. If anyone can fill in the blanks on Mr Canning's career, tell us something, anything!

THE FRESHIES
'Tell Her I'm Ill' (MCA, 1981).

The late Chris Sievey is undoubtfully one of pop music's true mavericks. His band The Freshies moved seamlessly through the gears from haphazard DIY'ers to daytime radio releasing some wonderful records on the way. The next level was always going to be a step too much as you get the feeling that Chris might have viewed Top Of The Pops as a bit of an inconvience when there were video cassette inlays waiting to be cut and folded for his next vanity project. 99% of other bands would give there right arm for a song as good as 'Tell Her I'm Ill' but in typical nonchalant fashion The Freshies buried it on a B-side (twice!).

THE FADERS
'Library Book' (Rip Off, 1979).

With Good Vibrations having the monopoly on Northern Ireland's young punk talent, the aptly named Rip Off Records had to make do with showband chancers and pub rock casualties. The Faders from Ballymoney belonged to the slightly less contrived latter category. More often than not there was something worthwhile on at least one side of a Rip Off 45 and The Faders deliver on the excellent 'Library Book'. This should have a printed brown paper bag sleeve but mine is missing having likely been recycled long ago by the clueless Lulu (not that one, surely?) who has also committed a further act of atrocity by defacing the label.

NIGHTSHIFT
'She Makes Me Love Her (But She Don't Make It Easy)' (Zoom, 1978).

Edinburgh trio Nightshift released a total of 5 singles between 1978 and 1981, one of which ('Don't Rush The Good Things') was later covered by Tina Turner. The first two singles on Zoom Records have been a staple of cheap boxes locally for many years, in fact one ex record shop owner is still knocking out dead stock online for next to nothing. I've been as guilty as anyone of neglect with a recent catch up of rarely played 45's in my collection resulting in a 'how the hell did I miss that?' moment. Whoever decided that 'She Makes Me Love Her' should be the B-side has a lot to answer for!

THE FOUR KINGS
'Rock 'n' Roll (Is Here To Stay)' (Parole, 1978).

The Four Kings were missed by Cherry Red Records when they compiled their recent pub rock multi-disc set, but they were never really part of that scene anyway. Instead they had their own thing going, one where rock 'n' roll started with Bo Diddley and ended with Chuck Berry, and nothing else mattered. Except maybe disco if you can take the A-side of this single seriously. 'Non-Stop Dancing' could be described as a novelty record if it wasn't a total car crash, which of course makes it totally brilliant. Not as brilliant as the B-side featured here, that's pure rock 'n' roll with an abundance of amateur charm and punk rock attitude.

WHITE HEAT
'Nervous Breakdown' (Valium, 1979).

White Heat were originally known as Hartbreaker playing straight-ahead rock and were quite late in the day converting to the new wave. It seemed to be a change they were never really comfortable with given a lack of image and too many Springsteen-esque moments creeping in to later material. However, there are no such issues on this record with 'Nervous Breakdown' being widely viewed as a punkpop classic. The B-side 'Sammy Sez' is great too if a little more adventurous. Came packaged in a nice fold over sleeve, but using staples to hold the inner die-cut was never a good idea!

SILVER MACHINE
'Take Me In Your Arms' (Hillside, 1978).

Pictures I've seen of Silver Machine reveal a 'hair too long, trousers all wrong' image. If that's not enough to put you off then let me tell you that the A-side of this double A-side features a wimpy pop ballad that's placed firmly in club/cabaret territory. Thankfully 'Take Me In Your Arms' (the AA-side) is a full scale major upgrade. It's as if someone had accidentally turned up the guitars till they hit the red and the kids in the wrong trousers were inspired to knock out some first album Ramones with a healthy dose of Bolan boogie. If you're considering adding this to the wants list, the words 'deep pockets' and 'patience' come to mind.

BEE BEE CEE
'You Gotta Know Girl' (REL, 1977).

This lot were active in early 1977 under the name The Lurch playing rock and pop covers in and around the Edinburgh area. The addition of a few Ramones inspired originals to their set saw local press describe The Lurch as 'Edinburgh's first new wave band'. A name change to Bee Bee Cee and a more punk image followed though not everyone was on the same page with drummer Zokko seen wearing last year's jeans on the sleeve of their single! Thankfully, 'You Gotta Know Girl' makes all the right noises and is now much in demand among genre purists.

COLE YOUNGER AND THE KOOLETTES
'Ice Cole Love' (Logo, 1981).

Cole Younger maybe would have liked to have been David Essex in 1975, or at least had the same level of success. Fast forward a few years and he had no such ambitions, instead he seemed content making the occasional great pop record with each one becoming more and more tuned to the new wave. The A-side of this single 'It'll Be Alright On The Night' is an excellent powerpopper but even better in my opinion is the flip 'Ice Cole Love' which compliments those ever present pop hooks with some noisy punk guitar.

THE QUADS
'Gang Of Kids' (Big Bear, 1981).

It seems to be most people's opinion that The Quads peaked with their first single and I suppose there is some merit to that thought. Given that 'There Must Be Thousands' was recorded pretty much live in the studio with very little in the way of any post production, later records do lose a little of that obvious energy. 'Gang Of Kids' from the B-side of the band's 4th single comes closest to hitting the same heights as that debut adding some catchy Chris Spedding style lead guitar to their pub/punk formula.

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